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This is an interesting topic. I have ADD/ADHD. All my life. The question of its existence is not an issue for me, ADHD is a descriptive of a state, not a pathological designation. It may be a disease, but that’s not my issue. [and this is my personal, not professional opinion] That is, you need to recognize it and engage it, not drug it and ‘fix’ it. To me it IS a social construct… no less than genius or all of the descriptions of intellectual impairments; that is we have created these constructs to deal with something that pre-dates the construct. I don’t get why this is a problem to people, but people sometimes seem to want unassailable truths.

Myomancy: Does ADHD Exist?: “This is not as stupid a question as it sounds. We can’t do a blood test or brain scan to diagnoses ADHD so how do we know it exists? Yes some children are more active than others and have worse concentrations but does that mean its a disease, a mental health problem needing billions of tablets to treat? Is a ADHD a social construct?”

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[Folks in CECE912 read Alex Halavais’ article on blogging that references Liz’s trip to Japan with her son. Have a look at Ross’ post on m2m about their symposium. The m2m crew always have interesting things afoot.]
Social Science and Design Questions. Many-to-Many: :

Last week Liz organized the Microsoft Research Social Computing Symposium. I shared some raw notes here, and here is a good gaming summary, but most of the activity was in a private Socialtext wiki. Among other things, Clay and danah held a session on the lingering questions in our field. This should tease out what work is already done or in progress, but I thought they may be thought provoking at the least:

Social Science Questions

* How can we measure the success of different types of online communities, and their survival and prodictivity and various criteria?

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If you’re interested, check out what’s new at Fine:Family Involvement Network of Educators - at Harvard Family Research Project

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Vicki tells us, at Cool Cat Teacher Blog, about a convo, with links, she had with Stewart Mader about Wikis in Education: “On Friday, I had an enlightening discussion with Stewart Mader, an instructional technologist in math and sciences at Brown University, about the use of wikis in education. He will be posting a series from our discussions.”

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Weblogg-ed » Wiki Solution Manuals may be an interesting link for future thoughts on wikis and learning: “Darren lights upon another great idea with the creation of wiki problem solving sites for his kids (and Clarence has picked up the ball as well.) As he puts it, his students are creating the textbook in their blogs, and now they can create supporting resources in the wiki. Read the thinking that he put behind how to structure and assess the work his students are doing. It’s pretty brilliant.”

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Dave has some interesting comments from educators on Why Kids Blog. Check it out.

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This sort of makes it easy when people ask me why we need to deal with electronic technology issues for very young children:

Boing Boing: Identity thief rips off 3-week-old baby “Not only the child’s name — first, middle and last — but the parents’, plus the parents’ Social Security numbers and mother’s maiden name for each of us,” said John. “Everything needed to establish a fake ID.”

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Boing Boing: Fisher-Price shipping Kid-Tough MP3 player and digital cam: “Fisher-Price will shortly ship a “Kid-Tough” MP3 player with big buttons and a simple UI, and a digital camera with double-eyepiece for kids who find it hard to close one eye. I think the UI changes are nice, but not nearly so important as the armor — most of the kids I’ve loaned my digital cameras to cotton to the operational procedure in seconds, but bash it around mercilessly. I wonder if the MP3 player will come with DRM? It plays music from the Sony Store, which is a bad sign. Wouldn’t that be the pits? You buy your kid a digital music player and it takes over her PC with malicious software intended to control her use of it?”

Check it out… Preschooler Electronics – Child Digital Camera & FP3 Player - Kid Tough

October 2013

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