jason: jason (Default)

Was chatting with JuliaD and this popped into my head, fully formed. Thought I’d blog it. :)

“Every Word You Type”
[sign to the tune of "Every Breath You Take" by the Police]

Every word you type
Every card you swipe
Every move you make
Each ID you fake
They’ll be watching you

Oh, can you see
They are watching me
How that CCTV shakes with every step I take.

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every online play
They’ll be recording you

Oh can’t you see
They are watching me
Now my foot print grows right under my nose

Every move I make
Each photo I take
Every meme I wake
Each purchase I make
They’ll be watching me

Since you’ve found you can’t get lost without a trace
In your dreams at night they can see your face
You look around but it’s you they can replace
You feel so cold and you long for private space
I keep crying mr, mr please

Every move you make
Every phto you take
Every smile you fake
Each purchase you take
They’ll be watching you

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Mirrored from Lemmingworks.

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Don’t forget your shovel. :: Ottawa-Gatineau OLPC Meet-up March 21

Dear OLPC Users in the Ottawa-Gatineau area,

Our next meeting will give us a great opportunity to meet our aspiring local OLPCorps Africa group and to get involved. We will be meet and have a presentation from Sam Burton followed by discussion and hopefully some time just to catch up and share all of your recent OLPC discoveries.

Sam Burton is a MA Mass Communication student at Carleton and Project Coordinator of Jamii OLPC. Jamii OLPC is a multi-university, multi-national team applying to OLPCorps this summer. If their application is successful, they will receive funding and 100 XO laptops to deploy to their partner school, Matemwe Primary School, in Zanzibar Tanzania. As members of the Ottawa XO Users Group you have extensive hands-on experience with XOs, and Jamii OLPC hopes that you are interested in getting involved in the project, and providing insight, feedback and suggestions!

For more information on the Jamii OLPC team Click here

Meet Up Details:

Date: Saturday March 21, 2009

Time: 13:00-15:00 h.

Location:: Carleton Univ. Campus; The Herzberg Physics Bldg (HP) Room: HP4351

Map: http://www2.carleton.ca/campus/

Parking: Parking is well marked on the map and I think it is free on weekend.

With thanks to Brett Stevens for arranging the meeting.

Hope to see you there!

jason: jason (Default)

Clevergirl says

NYT: 21st Century Librarian is a great video currently up on the NYT video site about the role librarians play in (primary) schools these days. The libarian in the video talks at length about teaching children, particularly ESL-speaking immigrant children, to use search engines and understand that not everything online is true.

Check it out.

But I cannot. I’m in NYC with poor internet connection and I am having trouble watching videos. But you can!

jason: jason (Default)

Slashdot | Sub-$100 Laptops Have Finally Arrived talks about the The HiVision miniNote (video at this link of puter):

They ditched x86 compatibility and switched to a MIPS architecture to further reduce production costs. HiVision has managed to create a UMPC that sells right now for $120.00. They say they have refined the manufacturing process and have learned from building this laptop how to mass produce a laptop that will sell for $98.00.”

It runs linux, which will make AlexB happy. As I’ve mentioned, I’ve never worried about OLPC per se, but the concept of zero cost computing was always an interest. This gets the price point down, but is otherwise as lame as most puters in terms of being culturally/pedagogically appropriate.

jason: jason (Default)

Slashdot | MIT Team Working On a $12 Apple (II) Desktop

PC Pro: News: MIT working on £6 Apple desktop

A new project to create a £6 computer is underway at MIT, the same University that spawned the One Laptop Per Child non-profit laptop.
The PCs will be loosely based on Apple 2 machines, first unveiled over 30 years ago, and the team are actively recruiting enthusiasts of the retro computer to help with development.

The Apple 2 was the first mass-produced PC, which sold over 5 million units. It was extremely popular for educational use in the 80s, but is set to get a new lease on life.

Rather than a laptop, the unit will act as a desktop computer and plug directly into a standard television.

Designers on quest to build $12 computer - BostonHerald.com

Derek Lomas, Jesse Austin-Breneman and other designers want to create a computer that Third World residents can buy for less than you probably spend on lunch.

“We see this as a model that could increase economic opportunities for people in developing countries,” said Lomas, part of a team that’s trying to develop a $12 computer at this month’s MIT International Development Design Summit. “If you just know how to type, that can be the difference between earning $1 an hour instead of $1 a day.”

Jeremy and I were talking around this issue last night. He sent me a link to an article that claims that the OLPC’s a con, because it was never about constructionism. I find the notion silly. Constructionism as it was developed (not used) was based on using technology, so the two are wedded. Also, it is MIT, so of course it has to have a toy attached. And bowing in to allow for Microsoft to take it over is just fate. Apple offered their OS for free, but were denied, I’m told, because they wouldn’t open source everything. So now they pay for Microsoft. Hubris crushes all.

To me, the OLPC/XO was never the point. Julia D and I have talked for years about Zero Cost Computing before the OLPC came a long… so it was fun to watch someone do all the work. Sure they’ve failed in a pretty spectacular way. Sure it was an hegomonizing act of technology and pedagogy. But it sure was neat! They tried and have failed. Now more people can try, and fail less. This AppleII group is cool because it is a geek project. OLPC tried to be other than geek, but couldn’t pull it off. I’d like to see a proper educatator’s project some day too.

What is best about all this, is that any time you disrupt the corporate culture, even just a little bit, the world becomes an infinitely bit more human.

jason: jason (Default)

Originally published at Lemmingworks. You can comment here or there.

Ontario OLPC Users Groups » First Ottawa Meet Up Feb. 26

The first Ottawa Meet Up will be this Tuesday Feb. 26th for XO users in reach of Ottawa. You can read the details in the news forum post Click Here. If you’d like to join us leave a comment here or on the News Forum post.

See you there

Fellow xo owners within reach of Ottawa!

We will have our first meet up on Tuesday February 26, 2008.

The plan (With thanks to James, who made the plan):

Dinner at Habesha on Wellington c. 6:30 (Ethiopian food which requires finger use)

XOs work at the Habesha, but if a mass don’t want to show up for dinner, Collective XO use at the Elmdale Tavern across the road from c. 8pm or when we get there.

jason: jason (Default)

Originally published at Lemmingworks. You can comment here or there.

Jula D is now Dr. Clevergirl, PhD.! It was a great little celebration afterwards. JuliaD is my first student (from a grad course at OISE in 2002) to get a PhD. She says “Now I have to plan out the rest of my life. I guess.” Wonder what that will do.

jason: jason (Default)

Originally published at Lemmingworks. You can comment here or there.

JuliaD has a post about the JhaiPC which is doing from a bottom up perspective what the OLPC is doing from the top down. She and I have been following them for a while, her more than me, and it will be nice to compare the two projects. JhaiPC uses much more local input and technology, which is also a plus. there is the Jhai PC:

Before the OLPC, there was the Jhai PC, which gets regular billing on this blog because it was designed with and for a specific community (with input from the community) and then redesigned for others… I have never used one, but I am a fan of the model.

see Welcome to the Jhai Foundation

jason: jason (Default)

Originally published at Lemmingworks. You can comment here or there.

JuliaD sent me this World development report 2007 : development and the next generation, Vol. 1 of 1 and told me to look at Chapter 8, page 188, and this is what I found. It is very interesting to see what the world bank has to say about ICTs, and you can see what this has to day about the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project: local language content, access to information, skills building, child safety, etc… It is harder to become a victim of human trafficking if are not ignorant and isolated. Yes, food and basic healthcare, but why stop there.

Young people today live in a world integrated by faster movements across borders—movements of goods, capital, information, technology, ideas, and people. This chapter focuses on the two international movements in which youth play the most major roles: international migration and the spread of information and ideas through information and communication technologies (ICTs). Youth involvement in these two global movements can enhance growth and alleviate poverty. It can also broaden their opportunities, enhance their capabilities, and give them second chances when things go wrong in their many transitions.

Young people’s opportunities widen when they can migrate to work abroad or use today’s technologies to acquire new skills and get better jobs at home. More developing-country students are studying overseas and at home through online education programs. New interactive technologies are providing unprecedented amounts of information to youth, allowing them to become more informed decision makers and to communicate more with youth in other countries.

One problem is that young people in many developing countries have few legal options to migrate, leading to illegal migration and trafficking. A second is that the rapid expansion in mobile phone and ICT use has yet to reach many young workers. The challenge for policy is to extend the benefits of migration and ICTs to more developing country youth—and to enhance their development impact while mitigating the new risks.

Receiving countries can do more for poverty reduction and development by providing more opportunities for less-skilled young migrants—through seasonal and temporary worker programs and by letting the youth who do migrate use and build their human capital. Sending countries can also do more to increase the development impact of youth migration. The benefits from existing young migrants can be increased—by lowering the costs of sending remittances and facilitating return migration. They can also expand the opportunities for other youth to migrate by avoiding hefty passport costs and restrictive legal conditions on emigration—and setting up more agreements for labor migration. And they can mitigate trafficking and illegality by providing more information on the risks of moving and living abroad and by implementing policies that foster more domestic opportunities for work.

A youth lens on ICTs suggests that governments need to pay more attention to particular types of regulations, in addition to their broad regulatory and competition policies. Communal access to new ICTs is more important for younger individuals than older, so regulations that allow easy entry for prepaid phone card operators, Internet cafés, and village phones can have large payoffs for youth. Policy makers should do more to use ICTs to communicate and interact with youth on government policy and to promote local language content. Policy makers also need to experiment with helping the first generation of youth using these new technologies to do so in a responsible and safe way, mitigating the risks of child pornography, cyber bullying, and other such dangers.

temporary worker programs and by letting the youth who do migrate use and build their human capital. Sending countries can also do more to increase the development impact of youth migration. The benefits from existing young migrants can be increased—by lowering the costs of sending remittances and facilitating return migration. They can also expand the opportunities for other youth to migrate by avoiding hefty passport costs and restrictive legal conditions on emigration—and setting up more agreements for labor migration. And they can mitigate trafficking and illegality by providing more information on the risks of moving and living abroad and by implementing policies that foster more domestic opportunities for work.

A youth lens on ICTs suggests that governments need to pay more attention to particular types of regulations, in addition to their broad regulatory and competition policies. Communal access to new ICTs is more important for younger individuals than older, so regulations that allow easy entry for prepaid phone card operators, Internet cafés, and village phones can have large payoffs for youth. Policy makers should do more to use ICTs to communicate and interact with youth on government policy and to promote local language content. Policy makers also need to experiment with helping the fi rst generation of youth using these new technologies to do so in a responsible and safe way, mitigating the risks of child pornography, cyber bullying, and other such dangers.

jason: jason (Default)

Originally published at Lemmingworks. You can comment here or there.

This is a great little article on OLPC: OLPC struggles to realize ambitious vision - washingtonpost.com. It highlights what I’ve always thought was a flaw in the program: organizing the project through governments. I know there are many people working with governments who have vision and insight, JuliaD comes to mind, but in general the institution of government is beset by LCD mentalities (lowest common denominator). In Ontario we used to have the Unisys Icon computer
icon
(Unisys ICON - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia); a technology that kept me out of educational computing until it died and went away. The article notes how windows/intel is selling when OLPC is not. And why? Some references note that teaching people with windows will help them enter the workforce faster… no doubt getting them into service positions that will soon marginalize them. The old adage to give someone a fish and you feed them for a day, teach someone to fish and you feed them for life fits with information technology. Teach someone to use a program and you forever enslave them to a system. Teach someone to program and you free them to create new worlds. I think OLPC scares governments because they’re profoundly ignorant of technology. I think OLPC excites people who are not ignorant of technology because they can see the potential to disrupt a hegemonic system of control over information and technology. There’s no question, I do not think that the OLPC is perfect. I’m no evangelist. OLPC smacks of MIT hubris, and I don’t mind them getting smacked down because of it. I will take MIT’s hubris over Microsoft/Intel’s any day (though I’d take either of their support or funding for my projects, to be honest).

JuliaD and I (and others) talked about zero cost computing for a number of years, and it is still a goal: create a computer that can be dropped from an airplane (delivering more crucial aid such as water purification tools and shelter), frozen, left in the sun, rained on, etc. Ensure that it will function in someone’s own first language, even if they are not literate in that language. And it should cost nothing, relatively speaking.

It is a goal. OLPC is a step in the right direction. The other alternatives I’ve seen are a step backwards. That’s about all I have to say about it.

jason: jason (Default)

YouTube - In My Language (use this link if you don’t get the embedded)

A bit of simple and insightful brilliance. JuliaD sent this to me, thinking of the (c)cld419ers. But anyone who has felt misunderstood, or is curious about what in the world they can no longer sense, or [insert variable] should watch it.

jason: jason (Default)

JuliaD sent me this link:
WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future: Ron Deibert on the History and Future of Psiphon: “Professor Ron Deibert is the director of Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, a remarkable institution which researches the intersection of civic politics and digital technology. Citizen Lab is one of the partners on the Open Net Initiative, a project that Berkman participates in, documenting and researching internet censorship and filtering around the world.”

FYI Catspaw who has been the subject of this week’s readings and video in my (C)CLD419 classes, used to work at Citizen Lab.

jason: jason (Default)

Julia D sent this to me: Blogger gets ‘don’t cease-and-desist’ letter for his satire of ‘Second Life’. If you know second life, it may make sense. And if you’re in (C)CLD419, read it anyway, you’ll learn about second life at the end of the course, and then it may make sense!

Oh, and don’t forget to visit Get a First Life: A One Page Satire of Second Life
picture-2.jpg

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

The $100 laptop: What went wrong - MSN Money is an interesting article. Though JuliaD and I have talked for years about the notion of ZeroCostComputing, and we ever had a blog on this topic for a while (follow that link!), we have never been mindless technopositivistic ethusiasts. Access to safe drinking water and basic global education for women were the two things the OECD cited as first steps in dealing with the digital divide, back when we were allowed to use the term digitial divide (see OECD. 2000. Learning to Bridge the Digital Divide, Schooling for Tomorrow. Paris: OECD Publications). Here’s my review of it in ET&S [4(1)] Unpacking Transnational Policy: Learning to Bridge the Digital Divide. Anyway, in general a free computer to everyone on the planet it interesting. The tool is cool. And there are many massively problematic issues involved. But that’s interesting is that this article is publishe din MSN Money. MSN isn’t part of this. I’ve read the M$ does not like open source. I wonder how much big computing, like big oil and big tobacco is willing to thumb the nose at doing something good (Gate’s work on aids in africa is not part of this debate of course) useful when it might get in the way of a little well planned out hegemony. But that’s just my personal opinion on it.

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

Rochelle’s got a wonderful post up (Random Access Mazar » MLearn: One Laptop Per Child) and a bunch of others from the MLearn conference in Banff. JuliaD and I have been talking about zero cost computing pretty much since when we met, and watching the MIT One Laptop Per Child project has been interesting. Rochelle has brought up many of the questions we have had, and added some from the Librarian’s perspective as well.

Introducing computers and digital technology into a new environment always SHOULD make one think about what is missing, what must be taken away, and what is lost, MORE than what is merely gained. Debates that can answer the should we or shouldn’t we do this in a definite clear manner are pretty useless to me personally. The question is more that of seeing that it is going to happen, how do we maximize valuing of what is presently there so that what we add is additive rather than destructive. I’m happy to see the debate from as many perspectives as possible.

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

[Listen to Thin Lizzy’s The Boys Are Back in Town on Last.fm in another window while reading this]
Catsy is back in down doing some cult/evangelicalical work for Google. So we’re having a good ol’time pizza night, which I’ve not organized in ages, this saturday night. Rochelle’s the major force, and JuliaD should be there if she’s forgiven me, along with some new faces who will not be embarassed in public. Just wish more of the crew were afoot. Seems like I haven’t made ‘Za since March for a group [see blog for the last and here’s a list of 28 posts relating to ‘Za on my site :) ] and I just hope that I can find something suitably creative to pull off this time. Wild Boar Prosciutto is hard to top. But I do have some truffle olive oil that Ken gave me.

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

JuliaD never gives up on her love/hate relationship with technology for developing environments, blogging now about:

Yet another example of the rugged hardware out there available for use to linking up rural places and places under conflict and stress. It actually sounds like it has all the compoents I’ve been looking out for to do a project.

WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future: An Interview with Inveneo notes:

Inveneo.org is a nonprofit that connects the most cut-off people in the world–they provide communication technology to people in developing regions or disaster zones which lack the infrastructure for normal telephone and internet connections. Their connections have helped rural villages spawn business, hurricane victims get aid, even helped the sick cure themselves by talking with doctors.

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

Slashdot | Solar Wi-Fi To Bring Net to Developing Countries

“TreeHugger.com has an article today on a new wifi development organization: MIT and the UN have teamed up to provide kids living in the world’s least developed nations $100 laptops, their 2 watts of juice provided by hand or foot crank. Cool, but… what’s a computer without internet access? Enter Green Wi-Fi, a non-profit that seeks to provide ‘last mile internet access with nothing more than a single broadband internet connection, rooftops and the sun.’ Their wi-fi access nodes, which consist of a small solar panel, a heavy-duty battery, and a router, can be linked together to extend one internet connection into a larger network. The two guys who started the company - Bruce Baikie and Marc Pomerleau - happen to be veterans of Sun Microsystems. Deployment is set to start in India at the end of this summer.”

And this comes after India said that they weren’t interested in the $100 laptops. But anyway. It really isn’t that new. JuliaD and I used to blog about experiments like this, in Laos I think, a number of years back, but times have changed, and it is time to see this in wider deployment. Strangely enough, it would also work for cottagers.

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

JuliaD’s Mint & Cannellini Bean Dip recipe is now available online. Thanks Julia D!

jason: jason (Default)

Ex-Lemmingworks. ##.

I got my copy of the handbook! Here’s all the info. Check out the Table of Contents (below) for a list of the 63 amazing chapters and around 100 authors!!!

International Handbook of Virtual Learning Environments

International Handbook of Virtual Learning Environments. Series: Springer International Handbooks of Education , Vol. 14. Weiss, J.; Nolan, J.; Hunsinger, J.; Trifonas, P. (Eds.). 2006, XXXV, 1615 p., Hardcover. ISBN: 1-4020-3802-X

About this book
What is virtual reality and how do we conceptualize, create, use, and inquire into learning settings that capture the possibilities of virtual life? The International Handbook of Virtual Learning Environments was developed to explore Virtual Learning Environments (VLE’s), and their relationships with digital, in real life and virtual worlds.

Three issues are explored and used as organizers for The Handbook. First, a distinction is made between virtual learning and learning virtually. Second, since the focus is on learning, an educational framework is developed as a means of bringing coherence to the available literature. Third, learning is defined broadly as a process of knowledge creation for transforming experience to reflect different facets of “the curriculum of life”.

To reflect these issues The Handbook is divided into four sections: Foundations of Virtual Learning Environments; Schooling, Professional Learning and Knowledge Management; Out-of-School Learning Environments; and Challenges for Virtual Learning Environments. A variety of chapters representing different academic and professional fields are included. These chapters cover topics ranging from philosophical perspectives, historical, sociological, political and educational analyses, case studies from practical and research settings, as well as several provocative ‘classics’ originally published in other settings.

Read the rest of this entry » )

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